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Friday Favourites

We’re always partial to a little illustration inspiration, and earlier this week The V&A announced its shortlist for the 2018 V&A Illustration Awards, which covers 4 defined areas: best illustrated book, book cover design, editorial illustration, and student illustrator. Here’s a peak at some of the illustrators and their work that made the list this year…

Illustration by John Vernon.

Illustration by John Vernon.

Illustration by Sinae Park.

Illustration by Sinae Park.

Illustration by Martin O'Neil.

Illustration by Martin O’Neil.

Illustration by Fay Troote.

Illustration by Fay Troote.

You can see the full shortlist on the V&A website (we found the story on It’s Nice That).

Image up top by Cat O’Neil, one of the shortlisted illustrators.

Introducing @Design

At the beginning of the week Instagram launched its new @design account, which promises to explore design and craft around the world as well as offering an insight into the design culture at Instagram itself. Launched in partnership with influential design magazine Dezeen, the team behind Dezeen took over the account to curate behind-the-scenes content direct from Milan Design Week, which has also been taking place this week…

For the art director @benjaminbuddy, design is about creating an emotional connection. “It’s the tool we use to bridge the gap between the form and idea,” he said. To inspire him as he designs for @instagram, his workspace includes memories of things he’s collected and experienced over the years. “My desk is a much cleaner and minimal version of myself,” he said. “I have a rock trophy, a couple of plants, a small metal llama and a wood statue of a frog.” And, in this photo, a kit that Ben created to welcome new members to the design team. “It’s all the beautiful and weird things I love.” ????: @benjaminbuddy For the launch of @design, we asked six designers we admire to share their #deskview and their design philosophies. #fromwhereiwork . . . #onmydesk #bts

A post shared by @design (@design) on

#OpenSky, a reflective sculpture by @phillipksmith3, and its host, a 16th-century palazzo, have a mesmerizing dialogue. The artist, who grew up in California, is best known for large installations that play with light and their environments, many of which have been placed in beautiful locations in his home state such as Joshua Tree and Laguna Beach. Now, he can add #PalazzoIsimbardi – and its columns, arches and frescos – to the list of environments he has sparked and transformed. ????: @thismintymoment @thismintymoment, a photographer and art director who also lives in California, took over our Story for the third day of #MilanDesignWeek. His hypnotic videos of Open Sky, and so much more, are up now ✌️. . . . #designtakeover #milanogram2018 A post shared by @design (@design) on

During our #MilanDesignWeek panel on Monday, an audience member asked whether our visual connectedness is causing style everywhere to become too similar, putting an end to local, original craft. The industrial designer @yvesbehar responded by saying that in fact he’s witnessed the return of the maker. “Making things by hand, such as sketching, prototyping, building – and witnessing that process – is a much bigger part of what is interesting for people,” Yves said. “It’s now easier to discover makers and become better craftspeople than it was even a few years ago. You can follow makers of all types, visit studios, and see factories all over the world on Instagram.” Yves, who lives in San Francisco and founded the design and branding firm @fuseprojectsf, shared this photo during the panel of sketches past and present, including drawings for the @hermanmiller #sayl. “Thinking about the design process without sketching is like thinking about a conversation as just its conclusion.” ????: @yvesbehar . . . #milanogram2018 #onmydesk #deskview

A post shared by @design (@design) on

Who knows what they have up their sleeves for the coming weeks and months?

You can follow along here and find out more on Dezeen.

For bonus Instagram inspiration this week, check out @montykaplan who takes beautiful photographs at sunset. They’re full of warm, soft textures and intriguing shadows, and here are a few examples:

A post shared by Monty Kaplan (@montykaplan) on

Past recall.

A post shared by Monty Kaplan (@montykaplan) on

End of a phase. A post shared by Monty Kaplan (@montykaplan) on

Hello all! Reposting this because i have some very exciting news i can finally share! The second exhibit i’ll be taking part of this year will be in jolly ol’ London, with @odtakeovers from the 5th to the 8th of April! The artist list is just AMAZING! And i’m downright honored and humbled i’m sharing a floor with these incredible photographers: @bandini3000 @ihoworth @arnaudmontagard @berbertheunissen_ @maria_lax_ @toby.harvard @alfarom70 Also! For the first time ever, i’ll be selling limited edition prints of some of my latest work through Open Doors Gallery (including this one, of course!). You can check that out over here: opendoors.gallery/artists/monty-kaplan So, if you are in London, save the date! And as always thank you to everyone for the support!!! ✨????????

A post shared by Monty Kaplan (@montykaplan) on

We found Monty on Fubiz.

PC Painting

Tatsuo Horiuchi is an artist with a difference. There’s no paint or pencils, no canvas nor paper, not even an Adobe product in sight. To create his elaborate Japanese landscapes, Horiuchi – rather amazingly – uses the simple vector tools of Microsoft Excel (yes, spreadsheets) to create his pieces of art. Below is a short film about “The Michelangelo of Microsoft” and how he works. You really can make art out of anything…

Found via Spoon & Tamago.

Light Leaks

To end this week’s FF, a mesmerising short film of Light Leaks. An installation by artists Kyle McDonald and Jonas Jongejan, the pair filled a dark room with 50 disco balls then set up a sequence of timed and coloured light displays and projectors, creating a quite incredible immersive experience for visitors in Paris, Nantes and LA. The duo describe the effect as something that “alternates between a meditative state, and an uneasy imbalance.”

You can find out more about the installation and how it was created on Colossal.

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