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Friday Favourites

Welcome to the latest edition of Friday Favourites, our weekly blog round up of our favourite creative stories from the past week. First up is Swedish photographer Carl Kleiner’s beautiful and unusual ‘Postures’ series, presenting tulips as you’ve never quite seen them before – living, dying, even dancing.

CarlKleiner_tulip_pink

CarlKleiner_tulips

CarlKleiner_tulip_petal

This story was found by Brendan on The Cool Hunter, who refer to Kleiner as “the tulip whisperer”. How suitably poetic.

Let’s go fly a kite

We’ve shared a few creative stories inspired by Japanese art and craft on our blog recently, and our latest find is ‘Pictures In The Sky’, a beautiful short film featuring Japanese craftsman Goyo Kazuka. Kazuka is an expert in, and teacher of, the traditional methods used to make Hamamatsu tako, giant square kites that are handmade using bamboo, rice paper and twine, painted by hand and then flown.

We found the film via Laughing Squid.

Vintage Smirnoff

Exploring the archives of the brands we work with is always inspiring and can often spark a new creative thought, so this week we thought we’d share a selection of these brilliant Smirnoff ads from the 1960’s.

Smirnoff_VincentPrice

Smirnoff_EarthaKitt

Smirnoff_GrouchoMarx

Smirnoff_WoodyAllen

You can see more on Dangerous Minds.

Calligraffiti

Combining calligraphy with graffiti and then projecting the results on and around buildings across Europe, ‘Heliographies of Memory’ is a project by Mexican calligraffiti artist Said Dokins that addresses “conflicts of power, destruction, and control imposed by both historic and contemporary regimes”. Although not visible to passers by at the time, the projections have been captured using long exposure photography and the results are quite striking.

SaidDokins_Leipzig

SaidDokins

SaidDokins_Bourdeaux

We found the story on Colossal, and you can see more on Dokins’ Instagram.

Shadow Portraits

A quick sketching session can be a great way to kickstart creative thinking, and we love Guy Larson’s innovative approach to portraits – scrunching up a piece of paper, drawing around the shadow it casts, and then using this as his starting point. You can see Larson in action in the short film below:

Found via Lost At E Minor.

Feel inspired? Why not give this method a go over the weekend – we’d love to see the results.

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